Do I need to be an experienced cyclist to ride on the track?
Absolutely not. We welcome people of all ages and riding experience to the velodrome. You do not need to be a competitive cyclist to enjoy riding on the track. Although track racing is all about speed, the track is also a great place to work out, improve your cycling abilities or just try your hand at a new sport.

Isn’t riding a track bike difficult and scary?
Not at all. Like all new experiences track riding takes a little practice. But we find that new riders are comfortable on the bike after an easy half-hour introduction. Our track is outdoors and does not have steep banking, which makes it a great first-time track.

Where is the West Shore Velodrome?
We are located on the grounds of the Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre on the Island Highway in Colwood, British Columbia. Once at the recreation centre, follow the signs directing you to the Bear Mountain Arena and park in the arena parking lot. The  clubhouse and track are up the short paved hill at the far end of the parking lot. For google map and more detailed directions click here.

What should I wear/bring to the track on my first visit?
When you come to the track for the first time wear whatever you usually wear to ride your bike. Bring your helmet, cycling shoes and pedals (we have some pedals, but you will be more comfortable with your own). Look for the person with the sign-in clipboard. Be ready to enjoy yourself!

I’m not interested in racing, why would I want to ride on the track?
Riding on the track is fun whether or not you are racing. We encourage everyone from recreational cyclists to hardcore racers to try the track. Riding a fixed gear bike on the track is also an excellent way to improve both your cycling abilities and your fitness. No traffic, no potholes, no hills.

I currently ride road/MTB/BMX, why would I want to ride track too?
The track is an excellent environment in which to hone your cycling techniques and sport-specific fitness. The fixed gear can improve your pedaling efficiency and leg strength, the tight frame improves your handling, the uninterrupted circuit is great for lactate repeats and TT simulation. Also, a number of track races are similar to road/MTB/BMX races, but tend to be faster and more intense.

Best of all: No traffic, no potholes and no stop signs.

Thirteen Rules For Safe Track Riding

  1. LOOK for riders before walking across the track.
  2. SHOULDER CHECK before moving up or down the track.
  3. The SPRINTERS LANE (between the red and black lines) is for riding fast/pacelines.
  4. SLOWER RIDERS must stay above the blue ‘stayers’ line, no more than 2 abreast.
  5. SHOUT “STICK” before passing other riders.
  6. STAY ON YOUR LINE if you hear someone shout “stick”.
  7. DO NOT RIDE ALONG THE TOP RAIL, unless you are preparing for a jump.
  8. SHOUT “RAIL” if you are preparing for a jump and coming up on someone riding at it. Rider at the rail (not doing jump) is to move down 2 bike widths away from rail.
  9. DO NOT BACKPEDAL to slow down in a paceline – move up the track.
  10. Coming up to another rider/group in the sprinter lane, SHOUT “STICK” and make a SMOOTH TRANSITION over them.
  11. DO NOT PASS ON THE APRON (flat part of the track).
  12. If you are in the sprinters lane in the last 200m of a race, STAY THERE.
  13. After finishing a sprint, always PULL UP TO THE STAYERS LINE.